All Blog Posts Tagged 'Cork' (37)

The Tragedy of Tralibane Bridge

Tralibane Bridge, County Cork

Down the hill from Francis O'Neill's homeplace of Tralibane, County Cork, is an 18th century stone bridge. If you closely read O'Neill's work, Tralibane bridge turns out to be personally very important to him, as a place and a tune. He wrote about the spot a number of times, particularly the "Pattern Dances" the community held there. No doubt this experience at a…

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Added by Ronan O'Driscoll on July 28, 2019 at 1:30pm — 1 Comment

'Famine Folios' -- Ireland's Great Irish Famine Revisited

Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut, has just published four new folios of research into the period of The Irish Famine under the collective title Famine Folios.

These compelling essays take a fresh and…

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Added by Brian Nolan on November 9, 2015 at 6:00am — 3 Comments

Things You May Not Know About Ireland: Cork Harbour

Cork Harbour claims to be the second largest harbour in the world after Sydney, Australia.

On the east side are the ruins of Woodhill, the house to which Sarah Curran fled after the execution of her lover, Robert Emmet in 1803. Nearby is the ruin of Dundanion Castle from…

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Added by Brendan OByrne on May 20, 2015 at 4:00am — No Comments

'May Day, May Day': The Irish Connection

As May Day is observed around the world, we take a look at the close connection between the Irish and the efforts to organize labor around the world. At home in Ireland the fight was led by men like James Connolly and "Big Jim" Larkin. In the…

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Added by The Wild Geese on April 30, 2015 at 4:00pm — No Comments

In `92, Billy Yank and Johnnie Reb March in Dublin

By Joe Gannon and Gerry Regan

It’s hard to believe that it’s now been 23 years since we participated in one of our most memorable St.…

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Added by The Wild Geese on March 16, 2015 at 4:00pm — 1 Comment


Heritage Partner
Tracing the Irish Potato Famine - Places to Visit in Ireland

Between the years of 1845 and 1852, Ireland’s population was reduced by about 20% due to the impacts of the Potato Famine, also known as The Great Famine or in our native language ‘An Gorta Mór.’  It is…

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Added by The Irish Tourism Group on March 2, 2015 at 2:30am — 4 Comments


Heritage Partner
South of Ireland Knitting & Craft Tour: An In-Depth Review

By guest blogger Constance Hall

Last November, a dream came true for me when I read about a knitting and craft tour that Irish Tourism had…

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Added by The Irish Tourism Group on February 12, 2015 at 7:30am — 2 Comments

Saint Gobnait, Patron Saint of Bees & Beekeeping

“Mo Gobnat from Muscraige Mitaine, i.e. a sharp-beaked nun,

Ernaide is the name of the place in which she is.

Or Gobnat of Bairnech in Món Mór in the south of Ireland,

and of the race of Conaire she is; a virgin of Conaire’s race”

Note to the Félire Óengusso, tr. Whitley Stokes, p. 73

I have a new…

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Added by Amber Ó Siodhacháin on February 11, 2015 at 7:00am — No Comments


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Camden Fort Meagher: A Must-Visit in 2015

If you're a first time visitor to Ireland next year, you'll probably already have numerous places on your must-see list. However, if you've been before and want to experience something new, then Camden Fort Meagher in County Cork might be for you.

The fort is…

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Added by Got Ireland on September 18, 2014 at 12:30pm — No Comments

Another Gift from Ireland

His great grandparents were Dennis Harrigan, (born 1781 in Cork) and Catherine Driscoll (Cork).

His grandparents were Dennis Harrigan Jr, (born 1832 in New Brunswick, Canada) and Catherine Ahearn (born in Canada, father from Cork).

His mother was Catherine Helen Harrigan (born 1873 in Stillwater, Washington, Minnesota).

He was Harry…

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Added by Dee Notaro on August 27, 2014 at 5:30am — 1 Comment

The First One

Ireland emerged slowly from the death grip of the last ice-age around 10,000 years ago. The land bridges which connected it with its nearest neighbors, England and Scotland, vanished as the vast…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on August 17, 2014 at 7:30pm — No Comments

Michael Collins: Saga of Heroism Against Daunting Odds

In his book "Ireland – A History," Robert Kee describes Collins thus:

Of all the many rebel leaders to shine out of Irish history only one stands out as a really effective revolutionary: Michael Collins --- He took hold of a potentially revolutionary situation in Ireland and made it work.’

Born in 1890 in County Cork, he joined…

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Added by James O'Brien on August 7, 2014 at 11:00pm — 7 Comments

Boutique Hostels and Unique Places to Stay: The Truth About Irish Budget Accommodation

When I first heard the phrase "boutique hostel," I figured it was a bit of marketing gimmickry at work. I mean, hostels were bottom-of-the-barrel, right? I suspected the word "boutique" was in line to replace "charming" and "lots of character" for describing accommodation that wasn't quite up to par.

Well, this summer I got a taste of modern hosteling,…

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Added by Irish Fireside on August 2, 2014 at 6:00am — 3 Comments

Irish Lady Who Gave Them Hell

Mary Harris "Mother" Jones (1837- 30 November 1930) was an Irish-American schoolteacher and dressmaker who became a prominent labor and community organizer. She helped coordinate major strikes and co-founded the Industrial Workers of the World. Mary…

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Added by Dee Notaro on July 5, 2014 at 12:30pm — 3 Comments

This Week in the History of the Irish: May 4 - May 10

The National Library of Ireland

Willie Pearse

DOMHNAIGH -- On May 4, 1916, the British…

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Added by The Wild Geese on May 3, 2014 at 2:30pm — No Comments

Top 5 Spectacular Walking Trails in Ireland

See what the Emerald Isle has offer on foot. Walk along gigantic cliff faces, sandy dunes and beaches,…

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Added by The Irish Store on April 17, 2014 at 10:30am — 2 Comments

Assessing Titanic's Irish Connections: Part 1 -- 'From Titanic. Good Bye all.'

By John Walsh

"Titanic Sinking" by Willy Stöwer. Click on image to see a larger…
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Added by The Wild Geese on April 15, 2014 at 10:00pm — No Comments


Heritage Partner
Lockout: Dublin 1913

2019 is the 106th anniversary of the 1913 lockout in Dublin. Often referred to as a strike, it is more accurate to call it a ‘lockout’ since many of those to suffer from the vengeful actions of the employers were not members…

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Added by Against The Wind on April 9, 2014 at 6:30am — 2 Comments

This Week in Irish History - April 6 - April 12

High bridge of the South Side Railroad across the Appomattox. Capture of this bridge allowed Union troops to catch up to Lee at Farmville

LUAIN --…

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Added by The Wild Geese on April 5, 2014 at 2:00pm — No Comments

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