All Blog Posts Tagged 'Genealogy' (184)

Did 'Bat' Masterson have Irish Heritage?

You probably know the wild west part, some fact and some fiction, depending upon which movie you watch. 

William Barclay "Bat" Masterson (1853 –  1921) was a figure of the American "old west" known as a buffalo hunter, U.S. Marshal and Army scout, avid fisherman, gambler,…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on April 8, 2015 at 5:00am — 1 Comment

April as a Surname

This interesting and uncommon name is of Old French origin.  It was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066 and derives from the Old French "avril(l)."  The month of April, ultimately from the Latin "aprilis", a derivative of "aperire", to open, has reference to…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on April 1, 2015 at 5:00am — 2 Comments

Irish Signer of the Declaration of Independence

James Smith was born in Ireland's province of Ulster in 1719 and went to the American colonies as a boy. A member of the Continental Congress 1776-1778,  he  served in the war of independence as a Colonel of the Pennsylvania Militia from 1775-1776. Smith died on 11 July 1806. He was also a…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on March 25, 2015 at 5:30am — No Comments

Galvanized Yankees

If you live in the southern part of the United States, you know they are still not over the war. Which war? The one where the south lost!  So thought I would stir the pot a little.

A large part of the 34th Mississippi Infantry was captured on the 24th of November, 1863 at…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on March 18, 2015 at 5:00am — 4 Comments

The Irish 'Flavor' of the Erie Canal Workforce

When European settlement of North America started pushing inland from the coast, transportation problems repeatedly occurred. The biggest problem was the Appalachian Mountains, 400 miles from the coast.  This made it difficult to transport goods as well as…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on March 7, 2015 at 5:30am — 1 Comment

‘Dr. William Edward Dillon, Navy Surgeon in Livingstone’s Africa’ by Julia Turner - the worst book I have ever read

Many people are familiar with the exploits of the Victorian explorer David Livingstone in Africa, his missionary work, anti-slavery agitation and his meeting with the journalist, Henry Morton Stanley on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, in November 1871 which gave rise to the now famous, and much parodied phrase, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?”

Few people are aware that when contact with Livingstone was again lost after he parted company with Stanley, concern about his safety and health…

Continue

Added by Kieron Punch on March 4, 2015 at 2:16pm — No Comments

Bill's Blog

Read about the great woman from Cork, Mary Nagle Donohue, who was buried unknown and unmarked in a pauper's grave in Lackawanna, NY: www.billdonohue.ws. ;

Added by William J. Donohue on March 3, 2015 at 9:32am — No Comments

GRANDMOTHER J. SWEENEY

Added by JOHN F SWEENEY on March 1, 2015 at 8:44pm — No Comments

The Irish of Savannah

The Irish were present at the creation of Georgia as a British colony in 1733. The second Royal Governor (1757-1760) of the colony was the Monaghan-born naval explorer Henry Ellis.  By treaty signed in 1763 with the Creek Indians, a tract of land was transferred which was roughly…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on February 28, 2015 at 5:30am — No Comments

Blame it On Christopher Columbus - Remember Chocolate is Also His Fault!

Before Columbus, Europe had never tasted potatoes, tomatoes, red peppers, chocolate, pumpkins, coconuts, pineapples, strawberries, and much more.  All these food items are native to the Americas.  Although explorers brought potatoes back from the New World in the early 1500s,…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on February 21, 2015 at 5:00am — 1 Comment

Wexford-Born Signer of the U.S. Constitution

Thomas Fitzsimons was born at Ballikilty, County Wexford, Ireland in October of 1741 to Anthony Fitzsymons in the mid-1750s.  We know his mother's name was Jane, but we do not have a record of her maiden surname.  Fitzsimons immigrated to Philadelphia where his father…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on February 14, 2015 at 4:30am — 2 Comments

Coats of Arms and Heraldry

Heraldry is the profession, study, or art of creating, granting, and blazoning arms and ruling on questions of rank or protocol, as exercised by an officer of arms. Heraldry, the word, in its most general sense, encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on January 24, 2015 at 5:30am — 12 Comments

'Jack Tar': Not a Pleasant Smelling Job

"Jack Tar" was a common English term originally used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. By World War I the term was used as a nickname for those in the U.S. Navy. Both members of the public and seafarers…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on January 17, 2015 at 5:00am — 3 Comments

The Woman Who Married Irishmen

What’s hard about doing your family tree is finding some branches you’d rather break off, and one that comes to mind is a Kentuckian, a Gregory, whose 19 slaves were identified only by gender and age in the 1850 census, as if they were machine parts rather than human beings. That’s…

Continue

Added by Jim Gregory on January 10, 2015 at 2:00pm — 4 Comments

Surnames: Caledonia and Hibernia - 'Mac' or 'Mc'

Mac, Gaelic for "son", is the most common element of Scottish and Irish surnames. In both countries, Mc is always an abbreviation of Mac.…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on January 10, 2015 at 4:30am — 3 Comments

The Wild Geese Top Ten in 2014

A.D. 2014 has been a magnificent year for The Wild Geese Irish Social Network.  As this year draws to a close, we thought it would be interesting to compile the most popular articles and videos from the community.  Depending on how new you are to The Wild Geese…

Continue

Added by The Wild Geese on December 28, 2014 at 8:30am — No Comments

‘Who Turned Those Lights On? Kill the B------’: Christmas at Sea 1942

Part 3 of 3 of the Series 'We Will Probably Land Christmas Day’: At War in the Atlantic, 1942 

This…

Continue

Added by Gerry Regan on December 23, 2014 at 5:00pm — 5 Comments

Christmas Baby and Signer of the U.S. Constitution

William Paterson (December 24, 1745 – September 9, 1806) was born in County Antrim to William Paterson and Unknown named mother. (How about it, Ireland – who is she?) He immigrated to the U.S. at the age of two, and entered the College of New Jersey (now Princeton…

Continue

Added by Dee Notaro on December 19, 2014 at 6:00am — No Comments

The Pending Birth of Yeats' Illegitimate Son

On a Picture of a Black Centaur by Edmund Dulac

by W.B. Yeats

Your hooves have stamped at the black margins of the wood,

Even where horrible green parrots call and swing.

My works are all stamped down in the sultry mud.

I knew that horse-play, knew it for a murderous thing.

What wholesome sun has ripened is wholesome…

Continue

Added by Patricia Louise Hughes on December 18, 2014 at 10:30am — 1 Comment

Monthly Archives

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2007

2006

2005

1999

The Wild Geese Shop

Get your Wild Geese merch here ... shirts, hats, sweatshirts, mugs, and more at The Wild Geese Shop.

Irish Heritage Partnership

Adverts

Extend your reach with The Wild Geese Irish Heritage Partnership.

Congrats to Our Winners

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

© 2020   Created by Gerry Regan.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service