Orangeman Claims 'Irish Language has Become Political'

An Irish language development officer in east Belfast says many people there are upset by an Orange Order claim that Irish is being used for political purposes by republicans.

Linda Ervine said: "I know a lot of people in east Belfast have been offended by this."

The claim was made on Saturday by George Chittick, the order's Belfast County Grand Master.

Click here to read more from BBC News.

What are your thoughts on this?  Leave a comment below.

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Tags: Belfast, Gaeilge, Irish Freedom Struggle, Irish Language, Orange Order, Orangemen


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on February 20, 2014 at 4:19am

I believe people have the right to express themselves in their chosen language.  Perhaps If we had a universal courtesy language it would make things easier for all  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._L._Zamenhof


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on February 20, 2014 at 4:42am

Or sign language


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on February 20, 2014 at 6:50am

This may contribute to stereotyping

Comment by Gerry Regan on February 20, 2014 at 5:03pm

'Red ink,' my father's uncle Lawrence 'Turk' Condon called red wine. He was completely unimpressed with the French during his time in the trenches there in World War 1, fighting -- and ultimately dying -- with the Allied Expeditionary Force. Maybe one of this waiter's grandfather served him just that! LOL

Comment by Gerry Regan on February 20, 2014 at 5:04pm

It's not that the Loyalists have any great love for the Crown, it's just that the Crown helped them dominate political and economic life in Ulster for centuries. To each their own. Hey, can anyone translate that into Irish!


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on February 20, 2014 at 5:28pm

They did give you Lady Liberty

Comment by Riocard Ó Tiarnaigh on February 21, 2014 at 4:54am

Is amadán é, Chittick. Go n-éirí le Linda Ervine agus leis obair iontach, a bhfuil sí ag déanamh sa cheantar na Lower Newtownards Road na daoine a tharraingt le chéile - tríd an Ghaeilge.

Comment by DJ Kelly on February 21, 2014 at 6:13am

I have many Scottish friends and former work colleagues and I get the impression from them that a similar situation exists in Scotland. The east coast Scots (many who have Norwegian ancestry) are dismissive of the west Coast Scots and Highlanders, whom they call 'cheuchtars' (apologies for what I'm sure is incorrect spelling) and deride their love of the language, music and all things Gaelic. I think it's all to do with the perpetual struggle between the urge towards tribalism and the desire for integration. 

Comment by John G. Molloy on February 21, 2014 at 8:03am

The English made the Irish language political when they outlawed it. The fact that it survived illustrates the Republican resolve. The sides are divided by religion, language and only one side has a sense of humor, but if we have learned nothing else, we should have learned to live side by side.

Comment by Ryan O'Rourke on February 21, 2014 at 8:05am

"The English made the Irish language political when they outlawed it."

I agree with this completely, John.  Well said,

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