Did the First Marine Recruiter Have Roots in Ireland?

Tun Tavern was erected in 1686. In the 1740s, "Peggy Mullan's Red Hot Beef Steak Club" was added to the name of the tavern with Thomas and Peggy Mullan as the proprietors. Robert Mullan (peggy's stepson), most likely used the Tavern as his recruiting rendezvous.  

November 10, 1775, Robert Mullan, was commissioned by an act of Congress to raise the first two battalions of Marines.  Each year on November 10th, Marines toast the Marine's birthplace (Tun Tavern) on the most significant date in the history of the Corps.  

"Peggy died in 1774 and Thomas went on to open a tavern called Vauxhall, at Passyunk on the Schuylkill River, in 1775."  This seems strange as according to 'Find a Grave', Peggy and Thomas both died in September of 1774.  The plot thickens.  Peggy was a proprietor of the tavern Robert Mullan could have gained from her demise? Or perhaps the youngest son of Thomas (and Ann Roberts Mullan), also named Thomas opened the Vauxhall.

Robert Mullan was admitted as a member of Lodge #2 of the Moderns in Philladelphia on 29th March 1762.  "Beginning before the War some of the Modern Lodges had switched allegiance to the Ancients, e.g. Lodge No. 4 of the Moderns.  By the end of the Revolution nearly all the lodges in Pennsylvania owed allegiance to the Ancients. It is impossible to determine precisely when the Moderns' Provincial Grand Lodge folded, but it was gone by 1785. The Masonic Hall, built by the Moderns in 1755 was sold, and the proceeds were placed in a charitable trust and became the "Freemason's Fuel Fund." Thus, we can say that the "Modern" line was grafted onto the "Ancient."" 

In 1751, a group of unaffiliated lodges of mainly Irish membership formed the Grand Committee of what would become the Most Ancient and Honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons according to the Old Constitutions, now known as the Ancients. This society, which adhered to what it believed to be an older and more authentic ritual than the original Grand Lodge, grew rapidly under the influence of Laurence Dermott, who was Grand Secretary from 1752 to 1771, and deputy Grand Master intermittently thereafter. (As the Grand Masters of the period were mainly noble figureheads, it was the Deputy Grand Master who actually directed the Grand Lodge.) It also benefited from early recognition by the Grand Lodges of Ireland and Scotland."

From Wikipedia

Mullen is most likely a Scotch-Irish or Irish/quaker name.  

IMAGE

Views: 414

Tags: Marines, War


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 10, 2016 at 9:33am

Since the grand old Irishman, Robert Mullen signed up his first group of O’Rourkes, Murphys, and Haliahans at Philadelphia’s Tun Tavern in 1775 Marines have been busily engaged in chasing snakes in one part of the world or another.  The Terre Haute Tribune » 1958 » March » 16 Mar 1958, Sun » Page 39


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 10, 2016 at 6:28pm

Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 11, 2016 at 9:09pm

cache of http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/01-03-02-0005-0012. It is a snapshot of the page as it appeared on Oct 9, 2016 22:34:22 GMT.


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 11, 2016 at 9:26pm

"Before he left the city he went to the Governor's Club, which we are told met at Peggy Mullen's Beefsteak House, on Water Street, at the corner of Tun Alley, below Chestnut Street. This historic hostelry was long known as the Tun Tavern; and there, in 1732, when it bore that sign, the first Masonic Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania was accustomed to hold its meetings. For nearly, or quite half a century the Mullens, who had the fate of seldom having their name spelled correctly, were popular tavern keepers in Philadelphia. Peggy, whose name, of course, was Margaret, was the wife of Thomas Mullen. She died, in 1774, and was buried in Christ Church burial ground. In 1775, Thomas Mullen opened a summer tavern on the banks of the Schuylkill in Passyunk, near Eope Ferry, which he called Vauxhall. Washington made one or two visits to this place. Eobert Mullen, possibly a son, had a Beefsteak and Oyster House on Walnut Street, between Front and Second Streets, in 1785; but the spirit of Peggy did not hover over it. It is quite possible that the Governor's Club held sessions in Mullen's Passyunk House, for Washington mentions having dined there" WASHINGTON IN PHILADELPHIA A paper read before The Historical Socie...


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 11, 2016 at 10:00pm

Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 14, 2016 at 10:03am

Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 14, 2016 at 12:22pm

Two English grand lodges erected lodges in Pennsylvania during the 18th century, the Premier Grand Lodge of England(known as the "Moderns"), established in London in 1717, and the Ancient Grand Lodge of England (known as the "Antients" or "Ancients"), established in London in 1751. 


Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 16, 2016 at 12:21am

Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 16, 2016 at 12:34am

Founding Member
Comment by Nollaig 2016 on November 16, 2016 at 1:11am

Comment

You need to be a member of The Wild Geese to add comments!

Join The Wild Geese

Irish Heritage Partnership

 

Adverts

Extend your reach with The Wild Geese Irish Heritage Partnership.

Congrats to Our Winners

© 2019   Created by Gerry Regan.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service