All Blog Posts Tagged 'Poetry' (85)

The Incomparable Madge Herron

In April 2004 I was launching my first novel at the Irish cultural centre in Hammersmith, London, when a lady came over to me and shook my hand.

“I think I may be your cousin,” she said. “My name is Ethna Herron. You…

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Added by Colm Herron on May 3, 2017 at 7:30pm — 3 Comments

Childhood Memories, a Poem by Anna Kelly

A clean “Memory Slate,” brought to this earth,

Shining and new on the day of our birth.

A special place to chronicle and store,

Experiences formative, new and enticing.

Many of them significant…

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Added by Anna Kelly on March 15, 2017 at 11:00am — No Comments

A Poem To Salute St. Brendan the Navigator.

Ships, Real and Imaginary

It’s a piece of rock with a wonderful beginning.

A cause for marvelling in a right of its own.

Formed deep in the magma of earth.

Mainly composed of…

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Added by Anna Kelly on January 30, 2017 at 2:00pm — 4 Comments


Founding Member
The Gaelic Quatrain -- Students, Sharpen Your Pencils

IRISH SOCIETY WRITING CONTEST

The Irish Cultural Society announces its annual writing contest for students in the 9th through 12th grades in the Nassau County high schools. …

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Added by John M. Walsh on January 23, 2017 at 6:00pm — 1 Comment

In Time for Christmas

'Christmas is coming; the goose is…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on December 15, 2016 at 11:30pm — 2 Comments


Founding Member
Amanda McKittrick Ros -- 'World's Worst Poet'?

Anna Margaret Ross (née McKittrick; 8 December 1860–2 February 1939), was an Irish writer,  who used the nom de plume Amanda McKittrick Ros. She was born in Drumaness, County Down, on December 8, 1860.  She holds the…

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Added by Nollaig 2016 on December 4, 2016 at 7:00pm — 1 Comment

A Brief History of Poetry in Ireland

And there are among them composers of verses whom they call Bards; these singing to instruments similar to a lyre, applaud some, while they vituperate others. -- Diodorus Siculus, 8 BCE

All poets have the uncanny…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on September 12, 2016 at 6:00pm — 4 Comments

'Would you ever think of coming home?'

Why the emptiness of the emigrant's baggage can weigh heavily at times... A poem I wrote about the hardest part of going 'home' when you live half a world away (published in The Irish Times):
http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/generation-emigration/my-mum-would-ask-would-you-ever-think-of-coming-home-1.2515552

Added by Anne Casey on September 4, 2016 at 7:14am — 1 Comment

'Do Not Be Afraid!' -- Seamus Heaney: An Appreciation

Seamus Heaney, considered by many to be the greatest Irish poet since William B. Yeats, texted his wife Marie a few hours before his death: “Do not be afraid!” How comforting these words were to her I do not know. They seem, however, appropriate words for a man…

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Added by Jim Hawkins on August 27, 2016 at 2:00pm — 4 Comments

She: A Dedication to the Muse

Within the written she resides 

in quiet assurance of her place. 

Lithe and languid, with regal mien, 

she glides from the page bearing gifts.

The mantle, flowing through the…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on August 26, 2016 at 8:30pm — 8 Comments

The Poet's Glen and Creggan Vale

Three of Ireland’s well-loved 18th century Gaelic poets lie at rest in the graveyard of Creggan Church, near to my hometown of Crossmaglen, County Armagh. The poets, Filid Art Mc Cooey, Padraig MacAliondain and the rapparee poet…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on August 7, 2016 at 5:00pm — 2 Comments

Mars, Bars and Scars

Have you ever been to Mars?” I was asked one morning at 2am as I made my way up east 81st. street in Manhattan. I was returning home from a night out at Manny’s Car Wash, a favorite blues bar on 2nd avenue. I stopped and heard it again, louder this time, “Have you…

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Added by John Anthony Brennan on March 30, 2016 at 10:30pm — 7 Comments

In This Silent Land

In this silent land

Say nothing

And keep saying it

In this silent land.

Men draped in cassocks

Possess a Nation’s secrets

To barter for souls over open graves

And we stay silent

In…

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Added by Seamus Ruttledge on March 8, 2016 at 7:30pm — 7 Comments

The Injustice That Informs 'Lieutenant and Mrs. Lockwood'

My historical novel "Lieutenant and Mrs. Lockwood" is based on an actual Irish family, and I've had people ask about their story. The Lockwoods' story…

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Added by Mark Bois on December 3, 2015 at 8:00pm — 1 Comment

Harking to the Call of the O'Rourkes

(Sligo street art)

I was stranded for a second day in Grange. When I woke up, I had breakfast on my mind and enjoyed an Irish breakfast with a beautiful view. I had to be out by 11 a.m. as the painter was coming and the…

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Added by The Last Torch on October 10, 2015 at 8:30am — 7 Comments

O'Brien Press Prospers By Championing Intrinsic Value of Books

In the 1940s it was tough being a communist in Ireland. All card carrying members were followed by the Special Branch, tended to be boycotted by the establishment and were refused jobs. Thomas O’Brien had returned from fighting in the International Brigade in Spain against Franco. As a vocal and proud communist, and poet, he was faced with certain unemployment. Perhaps influenced by Orwell’s Homage to Catalonia, he…

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Added by Jillian Godsil on October 4, 2015 at 9:30am — 3 Comments

'Diaspora': Forsaken Hearths Evoke Those Who Have Gone

photo by Eoin Mac Lochlainn of a cottage in Donegal

What would you expect to see inside this old overgrown cottage on the side of the road in Donegal? Would you just pass by or would you try and get in to have a look?  Well, I was passing this cottage every day a few years ago until eventually, my curiosity got the better of me.

It wasn’t that difficult to enter, despite the tangle of brambles…

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Added by Eoin Mac Lochlainn on September 9, 2015 at 9:00am — 9 Comments

Dublin: My Hometown

I grew up on Dublin's northside, in Stoneybatter - one of the five ancient roads to Tara. Now, I live in Wicklow, but still feel the draw of my old hometown. Here's why ...

A friendly nod, a bit of wit,

A pint of plain, that's part of it.

Canal bank…

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Added by David Lawlor on June 22, 2015 at 7:00am — 9 Comments

'Heartbreak Ridge (and Other Poems)' by Bill Nevins

Book Review                                 

The true nature of poetry is to first give us an insight into the heart and…

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Added by Seamus Ruttledge on June 16, 2015 at 3:00pm — 2 Comments

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